U of KS Study: Medicaid Expansion Increases Employment Among People with a Disability

Individuals with disabilities are significantly more likely to be employed in states that have expanded Medicaid coverage as part of the Affordable Care Act, new research from the University of Kansas has found. Similarly, individuals who report not working because of a disability have significantly declined in expansion states, while neither trend happened in states that chose not to expand Medicaid.  West Virginia - one of the first states to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act - was included in the states studied. 

The trends have broad policy implications as many states are considering work requirements for Medicaid eligibility, and they also have the potential to show similar employment benefits for individuals without disabilities. "In effect, Medicaid expansion is acting as an employment incentive for people with disabilities," the researchers wrote.

The study, authored by Jean Hall, professor of applied behavioral science and director of KU's Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies; Adele Shartzer of the Urban Institute; Noelle Kurth, senior research assistant in KU's Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies; and Kathleen Thomas of the University of North Carolina, was published in the American Journal of Public Health.

PERCENTAGE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES IN MEDICAID EXPANSION STATES REPORTING EMPLOYMENT AND NOT WORKING BECAUSE OF DISABILITY

West Virginians Together for Medicaid